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Most nonprofits rely on fundraising events to generate revenue for their cause, with registration fees or ticket sales helping to fund upcoming projects and initiatives.

When event day comes, your event planners take center stage to help execute every aspect without a hitch, but your fundraisers should still play a significant role. With potentially hundreds of your best supporters on site, event day provides a real opportunity to continue raising valuable dollars.

Here are five tactics that any nonprofit can use on event day to help hit even higher revenue goals!

1) Sell concessions & merchandise

We’ll start with a simple one: just like they would at a concert, play or sporting event, you can benefit from selling snacks, drinks, attire, and collectibles on site.

The type of event you’re running can help you decide what is best to have on sale. If you’re running a physical event like a walk or run, having cold drinks available is always a smart decision, while a kid-friendly event can succeed with ice cream or other treats.

Otherwise, you can always produce some event t-shirts, bracelets, or water bottles from a local promotional company to put on sale.

2) Run an auction or raffle

Taking it a step further, charity auctions and raffles give you a chance to sell bigger-ticket items to really entice your audience to get involved!

You can ask for items to be donated from sponsors or other local businesses and then decide on a tactic to generate revenue from them. If you think you have a lot of big spenders attending, a silent or live auction can be very effective. Otherwise, you can sell raffle tickets for a few dollars each and then choose a big winner.

One thing to note about raffles: some states or provinces will consider them to be lotteries, so you may need to apply for a permit before your event day.

3) Create crowdfunding goals

With so many of your most cause’s passionate fans in attendance, your event is a great way to build buzz and generate funds quickly for an important initiative.

For example, at the start of your event, you can announce a goal of raising $5,000 that day to launch a new research project or to support a specific group of individuals. You can share reminders of the time left to contribute and how close you have gotten to your goal throughout the day. Your attendees will influence each other to participate, and the small donations each of them make will quickly add up to help you reach your target.

Read More: 7 easy ways to promote your fundraising event on social media

4) Pre-sell tickets for your next event

As your event planners execute a memorable experience for everyone in attendance, it’s the perfect time to ask people if they’d like to come back next year. You may even have another type of event scheduled shortly after that your supporters would also enjoy.

Before your guests start leaving, offer them discounted early-bird tickets to your upcoming event, and you’ll be well on your way to ensuring that the next one is a success, too.

5) Speak to your attendees about recurring gifts

So far, we’ve discussed four tactics that let you reach your entire audience at once. But some strategies work better when carried out on a personal basis.

Nonprofits know how important recurring donations are to their goals, and at your fundraising events, you have a lot of attendees who are fantastic prospects. You can have a team of fundraisers chat with individuals at the event and discuss how much of a difference they can make through a recurring monthly donation.

With the right technology, like Causeview, your fundraisers can simply hand over an iPhone or tablet so that attendees can commit to a recurring gift on the spot!

For more on how Causeview’s donor management solution can make your fundraising events a success, from planning to fundraising to execution, request a demo today!

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